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Ss gr 7 unit 8
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The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary for the Seventh Grade Social Studies Course.

Georgia Department of Education Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools SEVENTH GRADE FRAMEWORK UNIT 8 Africa Today REVISED 8/23/08 Page 1 of 9 Copyright 2007, 2008 All Rights Reserved Seventh Grade Unit 8: Africa Today

Elaborated Unit Focus In this unit students will gain an understanding of the modern cultural and physical landscape of Africa.When examining the specific elements of culture, students will gain an understanding of the diversity of religion and ethnic groups in Africa.Self-rule through governance has been an ongoing challenge as African nations have transitioned from colonial rule to one party rule to fledgling democracies.

Students will analyze how political stability affects the standard of living in Africa.

Students will locate selected countries and physical features in the region and examine how location, climate and physical characteristics have affected where people live, the types of work they do and how they travel.

Standards/Elements SS7G1 The student will locate selected features of Africa.

a.Locate on a world and regional political-physical map: the Sahara, Sahel, savanna, tropical rain forest, Congo River, Niger River, Nile River, Lake Tanganyika, Lake Victoria, Atlas Mountains, and Kalahari Desert.

b.Locate on a world and regional political-physical map the countries of, Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire), Egypt, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Sudan.

SS7G3 The student will explain the impact of location, climate, and physical characteristics on population distribution in Africa.

a.Explain how the characteristics in the Sahara, Sahel, savanna, and tropical rain forest affect where people live, the type of work they do, and how they travel.

SS7G4 The student will describe the diverse cultures of the people who live in Africa.
a.

Explain the differences between an ethnic group and a religious group.
b.

Explain the diversity of religions within the Arab, Ashanti, Bantu, and Swahili how the literacy rate affects the standard of living.

SS7CG1 The student will compare and contrast various forms of government.

a.Describe the ways government systems distribute power: unitary, confederation, and federal.Explain how governments determine citizen participation: autocratic, oligarchic, and democratic.

b.

Explain how governments determine citizen participation: autocratic, oligarchic, and democratic.c.Describe the two predominant forms of democratic governments: parliamentary and presidential.

SS7CG2 The student will explain the structures of the modern governments of Africa.

a.Compare the republican systems of government in the Republic of Kenya and the Republic of South Africa to the dictatorship of the Republic of Sudan, distinguishing the form of leadership and role of the citizen in terms of voting and personal freedoms.

SS7CG3 The student will analyze how politics in Africa impacts standard of living.

a.Compare how various factors, including gender, affect access to education in .

Describe the impact of government stability on the distribution of resources to combat AIDS and famine across Africa.

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Georgia Department of Education Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools SEVENTH GRADE FRAMEWORK UNIT 8 Africa Today REVISED 8/23/08 Page 2 of 9 Copyright 2007, 2008 All Rights Reserved Enduring Understandings/Essential Questions Culture: The student will understand that the culture of a society is the product of the religion, beliefs, customs, traditions, and government of that society.

What are the differences between an ethnic group and a religious group?

What is the diversity of religions within the Arab, Ashanti, Bantu, and Swahili ethnic groups?

How does the literacy rate affect the standard of living in Africa?

and development of the region.

Where are the Sahara, Sahel, savanna, tropical rain forest, Congo River, Niger River, Nile River, Lake Tanganyika, Lake Victoria, Atlas Mountains, and Kalahari Desert?

Where are South Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Egypt, Ethiopia, Libya, Kenya?

How have the Sahara and the tropical rain forest affected trade development within Africa?

How has the location of the countries of Africa affected their economic development? Governance:

The student will understand that as a society increases in complexity and interacts with other societies, the complexity of the government also increases.

How do the unitary, confederation, and federal government systems distribute power?

How do autocratic, oligarchic, and democratic governments determine citizen participation?

What are the components of parliamentary and presidential governments?

What distinguishes the form of leadership, public voting procedures and personal freedoms the republican systems of government in the Republic of Kenya, the Republic of South Africa and the dictatorship of the Republic of Sudan?

How does gender affect access to education in Kenya and Sudan?

What is the impact of government stability on the distribution of resources to combat AIDS and famine across Africa?

Evidence for student mastery of standards should include a balance of selected response, essay, performance assessment or communication-based assessment yielding clear evidence for mastery of state standards.(Rick Stiggins, 2004)

*NOTE:

The balanced assessment plan included in this unit is presented as a series of suggested activities
south sudan news today
.It is not expected that the teacher complete all assessments for a successful unit.
One
Darfurfacts
"5 Truths About Darfur" 1.Nearly everyone is Muslim 2.Everyone is black 3.It's all about politics 4.

This conflict is international 5.The "genocide" label made it worseSource: Emily Wax.Washington Post.April 23, 2006; p.B03.Wax is the Post's East Africa bureau chief.

The film The Devil Came on Horseback is based upon the photos and experiences of US Marine Captain Brian Steidle, who was employed by the US State Department as a military observer with the African Union in Darfur.In the film, Steidle refers to the conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan as "genocide" and the film's official web site describes the movie as depicting the "tragic impact of an Arab government bent on destroying its black African citizens." The film is endorsed by the Save Darfur coalition, which sponsored Steidle's 22-city "Tour for Darfur: Eyewitness to Genocide" last year, concluding with Steidle's address at the Save Darfur rally in Washington, DC in April, 2006.Here are some interesting facts to ponder:

The African Union, which has thousands of peacekeeping troops in Darfur, has declined to characterize the conflict as genocide.

Likewise, the United Nations has refused to call the conflict "genocide" and the 177-page "Report of the International Commission of Inquiry on Darfur to the United Nations Secretary-General" of January 25, 2005, concluded that "the Government of the Sudan has not pursued a policy of genocide."

Mdecins Sans Frontires (MSF)/Doctors without Borders has also declined to label the conflict as genocide.Indeed, in 2006 in a piece entitled " Darfur, Sudan: no peace, no food," MSF criticized Western governments for playing politics with food and other aid:

! "#Malnutrition and diseases related to it have been, by far, the biggest killers in Darfur.Heavy-handed US interference in the peace process also set the stage for massive killings in Rwanda in 1994.

Just this month former President Jimmy Carter and South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu visited Darfur.

Reuters reported (10/4/07): $! %&& &&&%' ( )* "*+!+,-," "**!./"0*)*)"00*,/"

*1,, *"$/ *2*32*3((*,*** !"#"$%%&'!(&))$*+,--.So, what's going on then, what and who is behind the "Save Darfur" movement? Sudan produces 525,000 barrels of oil per day with an estimated 1.6 billion barrels of oil in its national reserves.80% of the oil concessions have been granted to the People's Republic of China and Sudan is that country's fourth largest supplier of oil.U.S.oil firms have been barred from the Sudanese oil industry since 1997.I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed

without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today: my own government.Source: The Rev.

Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr., Apr.4, 1967, "Beyond Vietnam," Riverside Church, NYC.Because of its oil wealth and its ties to China, Sudan is able to follow a political and economic path that is independent of what the US government would like to see.That includes Sudanese opposition to the US war in Iraq and, especially, to the wars of America's closest ally in the regionIsraelwith other Arab countries, and Israel's military occupation of Palestine.In fact, Sudan has no diplomatic relations with Israel.The vast majority of Sudan's people are Arabic-speaking Muslims and Sudan is a member of the Arab League.The Save Darfur coalition was created by mostly Jewish supporters of Israel in order to take the spotlight off ongoing Israeli abuses of Arab people in Palestine, Israel's attacks on neighboring countries, and off the growing international economic and cultural boycott of Israel.It also had the perverse effect of taking some of the focus off the US occupation of Iraq, which has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands of Iraqis.Mainstream scholars of the Left, such as James Petras, and of the Right, such as John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt, agree that the Israel lobby played a major role in pushing the US to invade Iraq in 2003 to remove a perceived threat to the Jewish state.

4

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0#*9* 5!$6 9)90/0-**:**$1***1!2/$'&#&91#,*+,--.:; ( *3/"(*00 *0 * !+=

*3* 3**0!&'%!(0''3($'1':/4+,--*Should the United States intervene in Darfur? Absolutely not.If the American political and economic elites really cared about the people of Sudan and Darfur then conceivably there could be some constructive role for them to play but history shows that American interventions are driven by the narrow, selfish interests of American elites.The US showed its true regard for the wellbeing of the people of Sudan and Darfur by bombing the al-Shifa plant, the only pharmaceutical factory for millions of Sudanese people and their livestock, in 1998.On his personal web site, Brian Steidle calls for no-fly zones and economic sanctions to be imposed on Sudan.The same measures, orchestrated by the US, killed over a million Iraqi civilians in the 1990s.When asked about the half-million Iraqi children killed by the US/UN sanctions, US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright infamously told Lesley Stahl of CBS' 60 Minutes, "we think the price is worth it." The US government is interested in Sudan and Darfur only as part of its quest for global economic and military dominance.

Because the US military is currently overextended in Afghanistan and Iraq it has taken a comparatively low-key approach to Sudan, so far, but that will change if the Save Darfur coalition gets its way.All decent people are right to be concerned about the malnutrition, rape, and other violence in Darfur but the best thing they can do for the people of Darfur is to stop American intervention in the region and to tell the truth to others about what is happening there and about the hidden agenda of the Save Darfur coalition.For more information, go to:

Pan-African News Veteran for .

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