Office Equipment Inventory List Template
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Office Equipment Inventory List Template

Home inventory checklist
Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistHome Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory Checklist*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #1(See Page 25.)$Living RoomNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Closet Contents*DesksFireplace ShelvesHome Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistDining RoomNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window UnitsBric-a-brac*BuetCabinets and Contents*Dining Room LinensWall Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #2(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistFamily Room/Den/OceNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Card TableChairsCloset Contents*CouchDeskFireplace Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #3(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistKitchen/Laundry RoomNumber of ItemsItemYear and BoardKitchen UtensilsLinensPortable DishwasherPots and Machine*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #4(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistBathroomsNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostCabinets and Contents*Closet Contents*Electrical AppliancesLinens*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #5(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistHallsNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostBric-a-brac*Cabinets and Contents*ChairsCloset Contents*LampsRugsTables*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #6(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistMaster BedroomNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Closet Contents*DeskDressers and Contents*Dressing TableLampsRugSewing MachineTablesWall Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #7(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistBedroom #2Number of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Closet Contents*DeskDressers and Contents*Dressing TableLampsRugSewing MachineTablesWall Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #8(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistBedroom #3Number of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Closet Contents*DeskDressers and Contents*Dressing TableLampsRugSewing MachineTablesWall Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #9(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistBedroom #4Number of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAir Conditioner Window and Contents*Closet Contents*DeskDressers and Contents*Dressing TableLampsRugSewing MachineTablesWall Shelves*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #10(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistAtticNumber of ItemsItemYear StorageTrunk and Contents**Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #11(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistBasementNumber of ItemsItemYear ToolsHeating UnitLuggageOther MachineWorkbench*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #12(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistGarageNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCostAuto EquipmentGarden ToolsLawn FurnitureLawn GamesOther ToolsStorage*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #13(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory NumberYear PurchasedCost*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #14(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistClothingNumber of ItemsItemYear PurchasedCost*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #15(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistCollector’s ItemsItem/BrandSerial NumberYear PurchasedCostAntiquesFigurinesArt ObjectsPaintings

*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #16(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory NumberYear PurchasedCostVCR-DVD Accessories (Fax, Scanners, Printers, etc.)

Stereo EquipmentTelevisionsVideo EquipmentGame Systems (Nintendo, Playstation, etc.)*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #17(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistHobbiesItem/BrandSerial NumberYear PurchasedCostCollections (Coin, etc.)Craft MaterialsPhotographyMusical Instruments

Toys*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #18(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistJewelry and FursItem/BrandSerial NumberYear applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #19(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory NumberYear PurchasedCostLawn MowerPower Tools*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #20(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistPrecious Metal Items (Gold, Silver, Pewter, Etc.)Item/BrandSerial NumberYear PurchasedCost*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #21(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistSports EquipmentItem/BrandSerial NumberYear PurchasedCostBikesBowling EquipmentFishing EquipmentGolf EquipmentSkisSwim and Diving GearTennis Rackets*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #22(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistNumber of ItemsYear PurchasedCost*Where applicable, itemize contents in extra space provided.Total #23(See Page 25.)$Home Inventory Checklist

PageHome Inventory ChecklistTotal Number of ItemsTotal CostEnter your to
Technology inventory worksheets
About this Section This is the most critical piece of documentation because, unlike virtually all the other information, if you don't have this written down, it's possible you may lose it altogether.

You can always go to your computers to find out what they are, but if you don't write down who you have a support contract with, you may not know whom to call when your server's hard drive crashes or your Web site goes down.Print this section out, and make sure key staff have an up-to-date copy.Domain Registration Item Assessment Domain Name

Registrar Name

Registered Admin Contact

Registered Technical Contact

Registration Login Information

Contact E-Mail

[as listed by provider]Expiration Date Last

Renewed [date, by whom]E-Mail Hosting Item Assessment Provider Name

Provider Contact Info

Primary Account E-Mail

[as listed by provider]Number of accounts

E-Mail domain

Spam protection / this Worksheet This is often one of the most daunting pieces (along with the software inventory), because it can seem so big.

But it's a great tool to have once you've got it.

Here are some ways that might be more manageable for you:

Inventory each workstation the next time you do any troubleshooting, configuration, or installation on it.

Set time aside each week to inventory one-tenth of your network.

Get a volunteer to inventory systems.

Arrange with your manager to swap a regular workday for a weekend workday, and do it all in one fell swoop.

There are a number of tools that automate this function with varying degrees of success.

Check out the suggested tools from the TechSoup discussion forums: tools:

TechAtlas: www.techatlas.com

Belarc: www.belcarc.com Network ID (Main User) Make and Model RAM Type SpeedHard Drive Total/Free Applications Antivirus this Section This is a generic form that should work with virtually any back-up process.

But if your back-up system came with another form (maybe in the software manual), that will probably be easier to complete.Knowing what your back-up system is and who should do what will help you test and maintain it, especially if the one person responsible for it is no longer available.These details can also be invaluable if you need to recover from a SOFTWAREAssessment Back-up Software & [Who swaps tapes, checks that it ran etc.]Backed-up Paths Database Backup Day Back-up Details (eg.

copy, differential, incremental)Monday ROTATION: [Describe] Assessment Type/Make/Model Driver Version

Notes:

DATE RECOVERY LAST TESTED: ONLINE BACKUP Service Provider Web Address Username/Password Support Phone/Email
Physical Security Risk Assessment

About this Worksheet This worksheet is a brief introduction to some of the firsout when it comes to physical security for your organization
office equipment inventory list template
.

It is not a replacement for a thorough security audit.DO NOT write your passwords in this document or store them in an unprotected place (such as on a computer or pinned to your wall).

For important passwords that the organization needs to be able to access should a key person no longer be available, store them along with other important documents in a sealed envelope under lock and key.Assessment Password-protected workstations [Do people need a password to log on to your computers?] Private computer access [Can clients or others sit down at your computers easily?] Screen-saver password usage [Are your computers set to put up a password-protected screen-saver or other lock-out after a set period of time?] Access to server equipment [Is your server physically accessible to the general public, clients, all staff?

Is it visible?

Is it locked away?] Network share security [Are the shared resources on your network restricted to authorized Password Rules [e.g.Minimum length, mix of character types, lack of repetition, expiration dates]

Other:

There are many ways to inventory staff skills, for a quick and easy self-assessment-based approach, TechSoup recommends you use the staff skills tools that are a part of TechAtlas: http://techatlas.org

A wireless access point is a small device (usually costing $40 to $80) that plugs into your wired network or into your modem and provides your organization with a wireless signal.

The worksheet below will help you get a handle on your access point, and give you place to record information about your wireless network.

Almost all access points have a web interface that you use to change the settings listed below.

However, the layout of the web interface varies widely depending on the make and model of your access point.Information What Is This? Example Your Information Make and Model The manufacturer of the access point and the model number

Linksys WRT54G

Network ID (aka The name of your wireless network, so that laptop users can distinguish your network from other networks YubaLibrary

Wired IP address The access point needs an IP address to communicate with your wired network.

Usually this number is assigned automatically by DHCP or you might have to assign it manually.

You wont need this all that often, but its good to write it down.

156.34.122.77

address The access point also needs an ip address for talking with other machines (usually laptops) on the wireless network that it creates.

The access point selects its own ip address on the wireless side, and its usually 192.168.1.1 though you can override this number.

Youll need this address when you try to change the settings on your access ? Is the wireless traffic from your access point encrypted?

If so, are you using WEP, WPA or WPA2 encryption? WPA2

Keyphrase If you are encrypting your wireless traffic, then you have to set a keyphrase.

Anyone trying to get onto your network
Camerpla
Revised: December 2009 Emergency Management Office UCLA DEPARTMENTAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE

DEPARTMENT NAME UCLA DEPARTMENT NAME:

Page 2 Overview of UCLA Emergency Response PlanPurpose, Scope and AssumptionsRoles, Responsibilities and Accountability

Roles of Department Chairs, Deans, and Employee Disaster Service Worker (DSW) Dept Contacts University Contact Mass Notification SystemDepartment Emergency Procedures Departmental Telephone Tree Department Emergency Phone Service Departmental Emergency Voice NetRecommended SuppliesIX.Instructions in Emergency Power Outage or Failure Fire

High Rise Fire Alarm System Hazardous Materials Earthquake Flooding & Spills Chemical Spills Bomb Threats, Suspicious Devices & Explosions Civil Disorder33

Assisting People with Disabilities Emergency Response (Campuswide) Campus Evacuation Areas Department-Specific Evacuation Plan UCLA Campus Evacuation Route (Traffic) LocationsXI.Recovery after DisasterUCLA DEPARTMENTAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE

DEPARTMENT NAME UCLA DEPARTMENT NAME:

Page 3 XII.Operational Department Status Report/DetailLoss Report/PersonnelLoss Report/FacilitiesLoss Report/EquipmentList of Department-specific Hazardous MaterialsShelter In Place Room AssignmentsDepartment-specific Needs ListDepartment-specific Critical EquipmentDepartment-specific Response PlansUCLA DEPARTMENTAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE

DEPARTMENT NAME UCLA DEPARTMENT NAME:

Page 4 This manual is part of the overall UCLA emergency preparedness effort.

It is a complement to the campus Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), and it is intended to be used in implementing the procedures outlined in that plan.There are five additional sections in this manual.

They are: Recovery Master Pages for Duplication

Various sections contain one or more pages that require specific information your department must provide.

This manual is not complete, and your emergency plan is not secure, until all these materials have been completed.

You will also receive from your Deans office additional forms which must be completed and returned to that office.You may delete sections that may not pertain to your department.

This document was designed to be flexible and adaptable to your needs.

The template is guide, designed to provide you with information and standards that are mandated by state law or has been adopted as a best practice.Each page requiring departmental information and updates is designated an emergency response (ER) form.

These forms, if applicable to your area, should be completed immediately and filed in the appropriate section of this binder.All UCLA academic and administrative departments share the responsibility for preparing for emergencies and disasters.The purpose of a Departmental Emergency Plan is to: Protect the safety of students, faculty and staff.Safeguard resources related to the Departments mission.Coordinate the unit-level emergency response with campus-wide procedures.Implement specific Emergency Management Team directives.

All Department Emergency Plans should include:Work rules and policies that mitigate potential hazards and protect equipment.
Inventory and storage of hazardous waste.UCLA DEPARTMENTAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE

DEPARTMENT NAME UCLA DEPARTMENT NAME:

Page 5 Appropriate emergency information and training for department personnel.Secure storage locations for department first aid and emergency supplies.

Effective emergency reporting and notification protocols for offices, laboratories and classrooms.Evacuation routes to building assembly areas.A departmental emergency information hotline.

Strategies for resuming normal operations.Advance planning for documenting an emergencys impact and cost.Access for emergency personnel to all departmental areas.Deans, Directors, Department Chairs and Administrative Officers should appoint a Departmental Emergency Coordinator to assist in developing and administering the Departmental Emergency Plan.

The department head must delegate to the Departmental Emergency Coordinator the necessary responsibility to: Coordinate the departmental plan with the overall UCLA Emergency Response Plan.Obtain suitable emergency supplies and equipment to support the plan.

Appoint suitable floor monitors to assist emergency evacuations.

Arrange appropriate safety training and information programs for staff and faculty.

Assist the department manager during an emergency.Activate the department hotline.The General Services, Office of Emergency Management can assist the Departmental Emergency Coordinators in preparing their Departmental Emergency Plan.

Please call (310) 825-6800 for further information.

UCLA DEPARTMENTAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE

DEPARTMENT NAME UCLA DEPARTMENT NAME:

Page 6 I.

Introduction Preparation is the cornerstone of the UCLAs planning for emergencies.

The materials provided in this manual are essential tools.

Their proper use and implementation are crucial in achieving the universitys goals of protecting students and staff, minimizing losses and restoring operational status promptly when an emergency occurs.Proper preparation requires the effort, input and cooperation of many people.

Your success in securing commitment to and participation in emergency planning will help determine how prepared the people you supervise are when the next emergency occurs.

DEPARTMENT NAME Emergency Response Plan has been developed by the Office of the Dean and is meant to compliment: The UCLA Emergency Response Plan developed by the General Services Department, Emergency Management Office, in coordination with the Emergency Management Policy Group: EMPG (Chancellor and campus senior management); The UCLA Medical Center/NPH Environment of Care Prog
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